Indian Henry

Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Clean Up – July 1966

Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 1966
Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 1966
Clean up at the Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 1966
Clean up at the Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 1966

Joe Larin captured this group cleaning up at the Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church. Anyone have any names?

The Indian Henry grave monument is there today in La Grande, Wash.

This isn’t something new to Eatonville. In 2005, Eagle Scouts Zach Ingalls and Ryan Ames did another makeover. The story Is in Eatonville News, just click here. This time around there was technology used to find the sites of the other Native Americans so that crosses could memorialize them.

Mark Parton says, “The two photos from 1966 look like Tom Carlson and two Nelson boys. The lower one with three people I beleive the blond boy is Tom Carlson. The larger group looks like the two Nelson boys on the right if Im not mistaken.”

Photo courtesy of Baublits family and Dixie Walter.

Click on images to enlarge. 

Clean up at the Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 2005
Clean up at the Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 2005
Clean up at the Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 2005
Clean up at the Mashel Prairie Indian Cemetery Shaker Church 2005

Indian Henry’s Hunting Ground (ca. 1911)

Indian Henry's Hunting Ground (ca. 1911)
Indian Henry’s Hunting Ground (ca. 1911)

Here is a postcard of Indian Henry’s Hunting Ground at Mount Rainier, from about 1911.

Here is some information from The Big Fact Book About Mount Rainier:

“At Indian Henrys Hunting Ground, form 1908 to 1915, George Hall and his wife, the former Sue Longmire, had a [] tent camp. A government bulletin from 1912 listed prices at $.75 for a bed or a weekly rate of $15.00 for bed and board. You could have your freight hauled up from Longmire for $.02 per pound. This camp, known as the “Wigwam Hotel” rivaled the one a Paradise in popularity (Camp in the Clouds), however it was severn miles of hard hiking to get there. It was abandoned in 1915.”

Thank you Jeff Morrison for sharing.

Click on image to enlarge.

Clifford and Launa Manning (ca. 1930s)

Manning article from the Dispatch
Manning article from the Dispatch

This great article appeared in the Dispatch some time ago (maybe the 30s – still trying to find out).

It reads:  The greatest gathering of old timers here since the famed barbecues of Indian Henry will be at the home of Mrs. and Mrs. Clifford Manning Sunday from 1 to 5 o’clock in observances  oft heir golden wedding anniversary.

Among those expected to enjoy the beef barbecue will be Indian Henry tribesmen who attended the old Ohop School with Mrs. Manning when she was Miss Launa King.

Mrs. Manning was born in the log cabin of her homesteading parents, Mrs. and Mrs. John Dillard King, who came to the area in 1889. The King homestead included most of the land across the highway from where Ohop Bob now stands. The log cabin where Mrs. Manning was born still stands.

Her parents were originally from North Carolina. They left the state for Texas and settled in Farmersville, but fevers caused them to migrate across the plains to southern Pierce County.

Mr. Manning is a member of the Delano family and a third cousin of the late president, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. His mother was an officer in the early day Tacoma Salvation Army. 

The King Family
The King Family

Mr. and Mrs. Manning have one child, Mrs. Robert Games of Eatonville rural route, and two grandchildren, Manning and Frank Games.

Image courtesy of Deanna King.

Click on image to enlarge.

Indian Henrys Hunting Ground

Indian Henrys Hunting Ground
Indian Henrys Hunting Ground

Jeff Morrison says this photo is an original picture taken of Indian Henrys Hunting Ground at Mount Rainier. If you look close you can see the white tents.

Here is some information from The Big Fact Book About Mount Rainier:

“At Indian Henrys Hunting Ground, form 1908 to 1915, George Hall and his wife, the former Sue Longmire, had a [] tent camp. A government bulletin from 1912 listed prices at $.75 for a bed or a weekly rate of $15.00 for bed and board. You could have your freight hauled up from Longmire for $.02 per pound. This camp, known as the “Wigwam Hotel” rivaled the one a Paradise in popularity (Camp in the Clouds), however it was severn miles of hard hiking to get there. It was abandoned in 1915.”

Photo courtesy of Jeff Morrison.

Click on image to enlarge.

Torger Wants a Road to Mount Rainier

Man Behind the Canyon Road - Torger Peterson, center
Man Behind the Canyon Road – Torger Peterson, center

Torger Peterson, a pioneer from Norway, came to Ohop Valley in 1887. He built a farm, but road building may have been a bigger passion. These are the words from his autobiography.

“After we had cleared up some land, the main thing was to get a road, and the County helped us in this way; for every day we worked gratis, they would give us $2.00 a day for the following day, and this is the way the first road was built into the Ohop Valley and beyond.

It was always a puzzle to me how Norway, a poor country, had such splendid roads, and a country as rich in natural resources as our State of Washington, could get along with such poor roads, no better than a cow trail, and it was my chief object to see if I could not interest the people in getting good roads built so that the farmers could get their product to the markets at a reasonable cost.

Robert Mc Gilvery and team building the Canyon Road
Robert Mc Gilvery and team building the Canyon Road

In October, 1888, I went in company with Indian Henry and some other Indians up to Mount Tacoma. We went on horseback through brush over logs and finally landed in what is now known as Indian Henry’s Hunting Grounds. It was a clear day and the sun was just setting when we reached the Mountain, and I will never as long as I live forget that sight; such a park surrounded with flowers of all colors and descriptions. And right then I made up my mind to do all in my power to get a road to that Mountain so that the people could see that wonderland and inhale that invigorating Mountain air.

For twenty years I attended every County Convention. At first the people thought I was crazy when I mentioned a road to Mount Tacoma, but as years went by I had more and more followers. The Commissioners all promised to help, but each time failed me, so at last I decided to run for Commissioner myself, and was elected and the road was completed.”

Pictures are of the building of the Canyon Road, ca. 1919.

Building on the Canyon Rd.
Building on the Canyon Rd.

 

4H Club Builds Indian Henry Monument (1975)

Silver Lake 4H Club 1975
Silver Lake 4H Club 1975

This articles ran in the Dispatch in 1975. It reads:

Pictured above are members of the Sliver Lake 4-H Club who last Monday began building a stone monument to Indian Henry. The grave site also was cleared of weeds and scotch broom.

The rock monument will have a plaque commemorating Indian Henry. A formal dedication will be held in August.

Club members and adults who helped are Ken Smith, Scott Summer, Tom Bewley, Debbie Bewley, Krisi Smith, Lori Weeks, Kerry Smith, Lee Isom, Janis Isom (leader), Kay Rauch (leader), Evelyn Guske (leader), Lester Smith, Fred Guske, Janette Bertram, Shelly Smith, and Jewell Nelson. Camera shy Tom Guske took off on this motorcycle as the cameraman approached. Tom was work chairman.

Photo courtesy of the Dispatch.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Evelyn M. Guske (1914-2013)

Evelyn Guske died peacefully February 27, 2013 at the age of 98. Stories surrounding her will not fade quickly.

Below is the excerpt from the funeral program:

Evelyn M. Guske
Evelyn M. Guske

Evelyn was born on December 23, 2014 on the George Dean Farm near Kreger Lake, Eatonville, in the same house her mother was born in. Evelyn was one of four children with two sisters and one brother. She was the daughter of Oscar and Daisy (Dean) Lowell. She was raised on the Dean farm and graduated from Eatonville High School.

She married Fred (Fritz) Guske, Jr. on December 12, 1934. They acquired 160 acres next to Fred Guske, Sr., and began farming. In the beginning, it was very challening with no cleared land, electricity, roads, water or buildings. Through hard work and time, they made the farm into a producing unit. Evelyn raised chickens and sold eggs well into the 1970s.

Evelyn was a 70-year- member of Ohop Grange #812 and received a meritorious Service Award from the state extension service for 27 years of leadership as leader of the Silver Lake 4-H Club. She supervised te first clean up of the Indian Henry Indian Cemetery as a community servic eproject. She was a member of the United Methodist church, Mountain Star Chapter #179 O.E.S., a charter member of the Dogwood Garden Club, Sliver Lake Club, Loggerettes Bowling Team and the Eatonville Historical Society. She was a senior elder of the Snohomish Tribe of Indians.

She is survived by three children, Sharon Guske Aguilar, Jack Dean Guske and Thomas Aubrey Guske, four grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

Questions asked about Evelyn frequently were: “Is she still driving?” and “Is she still mowing the lawn on her riding lawnmower?” She continued to do both well into her 90s. One lasting memory for many young men was her tasty and very abundant meals served to the hay crews. She was also always very active in food preparation at the grange to include the Ohop Smogasbords. She was extremely proud of her gardens and had a knack for raising African Violets.

 

Indian Henry Grave

Indian Henry grave
Indian Henry grave

This photo ran April 17, 1954. The caption read:

Historic Grave: Mrs. Orville Danforth peered over a tumble-down fence at the grave of Indian Henry, a friendly guide to early Mount Rainier trailblazers. The town of Eatonville plans to move Indian Henry’s body to a new site and erect a historical marker. It is one of many projects of “Operation Bootstrap,” organized to end civic factionalism and economic uncertainty in the Pierce County community.

The grave was never moved, there is an historic marker.

You buy the original of this press photo on ebay. Just click HERE.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Robert and Catherine Dean Fiander

Our guest blogger today, Bob Walter, gives us some background of pioneers Robert and Catherine Dean Fiander.

Robert Fiander and his horses
Robert Fiander and his draft horses

The area’s first pioneer homesteader survived a long, hand-to-hand fight with a cougar, and lived to tell about it.

Robert Fiander was born in Dorset County, England, Sept. 30, 1847, one of 12 children.

Fiander filed his claim near Swan Lake in 1874, several miles west of what later became Eatonville, the very first white settler in this area. He built a small log cabin and survived by hunting and fishing, while clearing and draining his land for farming. His encounter with the cougar was presumably during those early years. He raised cattle, and draft horses, and then became a dairy farmer. He lived there for the better part of 48 years.

Robert married twice. His first wife Jennie, an Indian girl, had a son. Jennie died nine years later. Robert later married Catherine Dean. They had eight daughters.

Fiander is said to have introduced T.C. Van Eaton to Indian Henry.

After Van Eaton arrived in the area in 1889, he persuaded a group of men from neighboring homesteads to help build a road from Fiander’s place to the Van Eaton claim. Certainly Fiander’s involvement, being established and having draft horses, was critical.

Catherine Fiander is on the far right holding the baby
Catherine Fiander is on the far right holding the baby in front of Swan Lake School

Fiander was a county road supervisor for a number of years, a perfect role for a man with draft horses. He helped another settler, Herman Anderson, lower his wagon straight down the side of Ohop Valley to his homestead claim by use of a rope, a stump for a hitch, and his oxen team.

His daughter Susie (Scoggins) was five when she rode in the wagon with her father to Eatonville. On Ohop Hill his horse, Daisy, was so startled Robert almost lost control of her. The source of her fright? A boy careening by on his bicycle.

He served on the Swan Lake School Board for many years.

The Fianders opened their home on many occasions to travelers, and Catherine Fiander was known for her skill at treating and mending the sick, especially with the use of poultices. She comforted the dying as well. She had a huge, plentiful garden and shared her bounty with anyone in need.

At age 71, five years after Catherine’s death, Robert Fiander got a passport and traveled to England to visit his sisters, whom he presumably hadn’t seen in 48 years.

He died in Eatonville in 1927, age 79.

Salmon Bakes at Indian Henry’s Village

Salmon Bake at the Barr's near Kjelstad farm  (Left to Right) Mrs. George Barr, Sr., Mrs. George Barr Jr. and Mrs. Silas Barr Sr.
Salmon Bake at the Barr's near Kjelstad farm (Left to Right) Mrs. George Barr, Sr., Mrs. George Barr Jr. and Mrs. Silas Barr Sr.

This picture and article appeared in the 50th Anniversary Edition of The Eatonville Dispatch, July 23, 1959.

“A poignant memory of persons who lived in the Eatonville area early in the century, and ofttimes talked about now, are the salmon bakes at Indian Henry‘s village near the Nisqually west of town.

A keen friendship existed between the villagers and their new white neighbors and invitations were often extended to them to attend the bakes. They would come bearing potluck food to contribute to the meal. Pictured here tending the salmon placed on T sticks around the aromatic embers of burning maple are (left to right): Mrs. George Barr, Sr., Mrs. George Barr, Jr., and Mrs. Silas Barr. Sr.”

The second photo is one of the first settler Olava Kjelstad with one of the Barr wives. If anyone knows which one, please let me know.

Olava Kjelstad with Mrs. Barr
Olava Kjelstad with Mrs. Barr

Photos courtesy of Pat VanEaton and Steve Burwash.

Click on image to enlarge.