Logging

Logging camp

Logging Camp, ca. 1940s

I’m not sure exactly where this logging camp was located, or what logging company it belonged to, except that is was at the base of Mt. Rainier. What I think is amazing about this shot though is the scope of the logging.

Take a look at that logging camp in the center of it all, the railroad that took the logs out and the trestle. Just zoom in and take a look.

Photos courtesy of Sandra Woods.

Click on image to enlarge.

Logging in National

Isaacson at National Logging
Isaacson blade used at National for logging

These images come from Sandra Wood, who found them in her father’s things. Since he logged up in National, she assumes they are from that area.

Enjoy!

Photos courtesy of Sandra Wood.

Click on images to enlarge.

Logging in National
Logging in National

 

 

Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. (early 1900s) — Part 3 of 3

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Close up some of the crew at the Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. 

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Taking down a log for the Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. 

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Sawing down a tree for the Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. 

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The crew at the Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. in front of  a steam donkey. 

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Some of the crew standing in front of large tree taken down.

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Men standing outside the Elbe and Shingle Co. camp.

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View of the Elble Lumber & Shingle Co. camp.

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Taking down a big tree in Elbe.

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A different shot of the Elbe Lumber & Shingle Co. camp. 

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A close up on some of the men working for Elbe Lumber and Shingle. Co. 

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Close up on men working at that Elbe Lumber and Shingle Co. camp.

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Close up on the Elbe Lumber and Shingle Co. camp.

Logging for Elbe Lumber and Shingle Co.
Logging for Elbe Lumber and Shingle Co.

If you read the previous two posts, you’ll already know that last week on Ebay last week there was a wall card up for auction that I didn’t win. It had all sorts of shots of the Elbe Lumber & Shingle Company, as well as the logging camp and scene of the Tacoma Eastern Railroad.

Thankfully the seller broke down all the shots, so I can share them with you here. This will come in several sections. This is the third installment of three and features the lumber camp.

Let me know if you recognize anyone!

Click on images to enlarge.

St. Paul – Tacoma Lumber Co. – Kapowsin Logging (ca. 1920s)

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Crew and steam donkey.

These are great shots taken in Kapowsin, and some by Kinsey, the professional photographer of the time, who went around a captured the Northwest logging era.

The first picture shows the crew, as well as a steam donkey off to the left. The second shot shows one of the men working through a large tree with a handsaw. (My shoulders get sore just looking at this picture.) If you look at the third picture you can see the logging camp nestled down there.

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Working hard on a large tree in Kapowsin.

St. Paul and the Tacoma Lumber Company were big players at the time.

Want to thank Sandra Wood for sharing these great shots. There are more to come. Her dad had kept them over the years and she is sharing them with us now.

Click on images to enlarge.

St. Paul camp
St. Paul camp

 

Long Logs coming through Eatonville, 1960

Long Logs, March 1960
Long Logs, March 1960

This load of logs came down Mashell Ave. in March, 1960. In fact, the truck is stopped at the corner of Center Street and Mashell.

I can’t tell by the image what logging outfit this was. If you have some information, please share.

There has always been a need for straight, long logs, which are used for masts for sailboats, and the like. In fact, there is still a mill in Aberdeen, Grays Harbor Historical Seaport, that mills these logs for boats and flag poles. Hollywood hired the mill not long ago to create the masts for Pirates of the the Caribbean.

Photo courtesy of the Baublits family, and taken by Joe Larin. 

Click on image to enlarge. 

Tokens from National (late 1800s and early 1900s)

C.C. Ketchum Token from National
C.C. Ketchum Token from National

The old-timers might remember the town of National, a logging town up the line. There isn’t much left not except for some photos.

Randy Stewart also came across some tokens from the town. Both are from C.C. Ketchum tokens.

Token with the hole in the center was popular in the late 1800s.

Now I’m not sure (I’m taking this off the internet on a forum about tokens) but the token with the hole in it was possibly used for gambling.

“I have read posts [*] that also say they were used in slot or game of chance machines. You would put in a U.S. nickel and the machine would pay out in trade tokens to get around the gambling laws. The numbers are supposed to have linked the tokens to a certain machine.”

National Loggers - photo from UofW Library
National Loggers – photo from UofW Library

Another man said, “I’ve heard that those were used in slot machines in bars. To get around the gambling prohibition, the machine would pay out in those tokens, which were supposedly redeemable only for merchandise. Unofficially, the bartender would give cash for them if he knew you well enough.”

All I know is that these coins were used at National, probably by a bunch of loggers like these.

Thank you Randy for sharing.

Images Courtesy of Randy Stewart.

Click on images to enlarge. 

C.C. Ketchum Token from National (back)
C.C. Ketchum Token from National (back)

C.C. Ketchum Token from National #2
C.C. Ketchum Token from National #2

 

 

 

 

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Logging Trestle, Nisqually River (ca. 1915)

Kinsey photo of logging bridge
Kinsey photo of logging bridge

One of the big challenges to early logging was getting the logs out of the forest, especially when you were faced with rivers and steep hills. This photo taken by Kinsey of a trestle (I believe over the Nisqually River) demonstrates how they did it. The supports are larger timbers, but it’s the foundation that gives one pause. Big rains and rising waters could easily do damage.

Clark Kinsey documented a number of these bridges, and if you’d like to view others—some under construction—just click HERE to access the University of Washington’s collection.

Image courtesy of Laurie Anderson Osborn.

Click on mage to enlarge.

Logging Accident in Eatonville (ca. 1940s)

Logging truck accident - 1940s
Logging truck accident – 1940s

These pictures come straight from the Eatonville History Facebook group. This accident took place at the intersection of Washington Ave. and Center St., in the 1940s. Hope no one was in the vehicle.

Even though logging is safer than it was in the past, Forbes reported in 2013 that it was still first on American’s 10 Deadliest Jobs list.

Click on images to enlarge.

Logging truck accident, Center St. & Washington (ca. 1940s)
Logging truck accident, Center St. & Washington (ca. 1940s)

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