Mashell Ave.

Eatonville Hotel – 1963

If you were walking down Mashell Ave., past Key Bank, toward the Roxy, on the right you would see the Eatonville Hotel. It was part of the Eatonville landscape for many decades.

It was built in 1912 and was known as the Snow Hotel. In 1913, the rates were $2.00 a night, which would have been around $46.00 today. Not a bad deal.

To learn more, just search Eatonville Hotel. There are more postings on this site.

Photo courtesy of the Baublits family and late photographer Joe Larin.

Click on image to enlarge.

Waiving from the Flag Pole (1914)

Henry Christensen helping up the flag pole
Henry Christensen helping up the flag pole

We did a post a while back about the flag pole going up in 1914. Roni Johnson had an even better photo (from her family album) of the event. Here is Henry Christensen waiving from the top of the pole.

“Grandma’s family had the telephone company so all of her brothers were used to running up and down the poles. The girls ran the switchboard,” says Roni.

If this picture looks a little familiar, it’s because the Eatonville Bank is still on the corner of Mashell. Although the Snow Motel to the left is longer standing.

Photo courtesy of Roni Johnson.

Click on image to enlarge.

The Driver Training Car (1961)

John Van Eaton and Hans Olson
John Van Eaton and Hans Olson

John Van Eaton and Hans Olson shake hands in front of the Methodist Church on Mashell Ave. in September 1961. The plaque on the car reads: The Driver Training Car, Provided as a Public Service by Van Eaton Chevrolet, Inc.

Did anyone out there learn to drive in this car? If so, please speak up!

Photo courtesy of the Baublits family and the image was taken by Joe Larin. 

John Van Eaton & Hans Olson in front of Methodist Church
John Van Eaton & Hans Olson in front of Methodist Church

Click on images to enlarge.

Mashell Ave. in 1942

IOOF on Mashell Ave 1942
IOOF on Mashell Ave 1942

Josie Johnston posted this picture on Facebook the other day. It inspired some memories from locals.

Josie: I’m just messing around on some historical research sites today and found this very cool view of what the Hotes Hall used to look like. I did not know it was an IOOF before it was a Mason’s hall, but from this photo, I’m guessing it must have been.
Full description: “Black and white, close oblique angle linen backed photographic image of commercial buildings on one side of an Eatonville, Pierce County, WA street, 1942. Two story building in image center is the Independent Order of Odd Fellows Hall. The U.S. Post Office is on the first floor of the building. Sign in the post office street window: Register Now (Selective Service). The Roxy Theatre is in a building near image right edge. A bicycle is leaning against the street curb in front of the post office.”

Mashell Ave. 1959
Mashell Ave. 1959

Dixie Walter: When I moved back to town in 1960 the Dispatch was located in one of those places with the windows…not sure when the paper moved there since in those days once a newspaper picked a site it stayed a long time…the presses were huge and extremely heavy so no one liked to move much…sometime in the early 60s the paper moved to the little building next to where ERA used to be. Now it’s no problem to move papers as computers are soooo much easier to pack up and go wherever…I’ll see if Bob knows anything about the other photo showing the mountain. I’ve seen it before, probably during the Centennial…

Phillip David Smith: I was a past Master Canceller of DeMolay in the 60’s and spent a lot of great times at that Mason Hall; had a lot of great dances up there. Thank God we also had someone running the Roxy during that time.

Alice Wingrove: There was an ice cream store next to the Roxy and after a movie we would stop and get a cone to eat on the way home, Doris Olden Vormerstrand use to work there and she would really load the cones full of ice cream.

Karen Laura Lane Phelan: On the corner was the Post Office. The lodge was upstairs and Rainbow Girls and Demolay Boys sponsored dances for the high school kids. Further down was the Dispatch Office. At one time, Lorraine LaPlante had a little soda shop in there before you got to Pecheos Roxy Theater

A Look Down Center Street (ca. 1950s)

View Down Center Street
View Down Center Street

This image comes straight from the Eatonville History Facebook page and was posted by Josie Johnston: “This is looking down Center towards Mashell if you were standing in the street near modern day Community Center.”

Ryan Ward adds, “This photo looks like it was taken at the intersection of Center St. and Pennsylvania looking east.” And Nathan Hale agrees.

Click on image to enlarge.

First Eatonville School House (ca. 1905)

Eatonville's First School
Eatonville’s First School

The Eatonville School District has come a long way in the last 100+ years. This was Eatonville’s first schoolhouse. You can find it today at Glacier View Park. 

Here is some information about the little school house from Dixie Walter’s blog, written in 2006:

The following historical excerpt is from the History of Tacoma Eastern Area by Jeannette Hlavin and Pearl Engle written in 1954. “The first school was the log house built from logs and nails and on ground donated by T. C. Van Eaton. It stood across the Mashell Avenue from the present grade school building. Some of the Scandinavian settlers were “Broad axe men,” experts at hewing logs or lumber, and they hewed the material for the school house.

First School House (photo taken 2006)
First School House (photo taken 2006)

“The first teacher was Miss Alice Dodge. School was conducted only three months a year. Two other teachers taught in the log school house, Miss Hortense Oliver and Miss. P. Messinger.

“Some towns neglect their historic buildings but this cannot be said of Eatonville. The old log school house has been tenderly cared for and is often referred to sentimentally in writings and speeches of local people.

Clyde Williams says that when it was to be removed from its original location, he said to T. C. Van Eaton, who with a team of horses, was his partner on the job: “Let’s save it” and Van Eaton replied: “All right, we have plenty of room.” Accordingly, they hitched it to the horses with chains and pulled it to the spot where it now stands.

Mensik family school photo
Mensik family school photo

“Before 1912 church services were held in it.

B. W. Lyon told the Community Day audience in 1923 that when he was school superintendent here, an orphan boy was permitted to live in the old school house. He was placed in charge of the agricultural class’s poultry, and was allowed to keep what money he made from it. In this way he was enabled to complete the high school course here. His name was John Kruger and in 1923 he was head of the Agriculture Department of the Sumas public schools.

“The Fortnightly Club used the building as a club house for some years, and it is now used for the same purpose by the Girl Scouts.”

For decades the old school house stood in the area behind the present day tennis court at the high school. Eventually, through the efforts of the Dogwood Garden Club it was moved to it’s present site. The log building has been used as the Eatonville Cooperative Nursery School for thirty-one years.

Photo courtesy of the Baublits family and Bob Walter.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

Hotes Masonic Temple, Post Office and Dispatch 1964

Hotes Masonic Temple
Hotes Masonic Temple

In 1964, the year Mary Poppins hit the screen and Elizabeth Taylor was marrying Richard Burton for the first time, Eatonville was fairly quiet.

This shot of the Hotes Masonic Temple (next to the Roxy) on Mashell Ave., looks much like it does today, except that the tenants are different. Back then The Eatonville Dispatch the Pierce County Public Library were doing business there.

Photo courtesy of the Baublits family, photo by Joe Larin.

Click on image to enlarge.

Robin Hood Day Parade (1955)

Robin Hood Parade 1955
Robin Hood Day Parade 1955

Robin Hood Day of 1955 was part of the Operation Bootstrap. Bootstrap was Eatonville’s attempt to reinvent itself and bring in new business after the closing of the Eatonville Lumber Mill — it’s primary business.

These shots were taken of the Robin Hood Parade held on Mashell Ave. in 1955. For another shot of the parade, click HERE.

Photos courtesy of Rich and Ruthie Williams.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

Robin Hood Parade 1955 (b)
Robin Hood Day Parade 1955 (b)

Robin Hood Parade 1955 (c)
Robin Hood Day Parade 1955 (c)

Car Crashes into Building on Mashell, 1960

Car Wreck 1960 1
Car Wreck 1960 1

This wreck took place March, 1960. Did some damage to the Dodge building on Mashell Ave., which I believe was the old Sears building across kitty corner from the bank. It looks like it involved two cars.

If you have details about this accident, please share.

I do like in the bottom corner of the first shot is a flier for a dance coming up at the Ohop Grange on April 2.

Photos courtesy of the Baublits family and taken by Joe Larin.

Click on images to enlarge.
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