Mount Rainier

Jonas Asplund, W7IG – ham radio in 1948

1948 W71G postcard by Jonas Asplund
1948 W71G postcard by Jonas Asplund

Jonas Asplund, was a farmer, a pilot . . . as well as a ham radio operator, call sign W71G.

QSO commonly refers to the contact between two amateur radio stations. Jonas mailed this proof of contact out to Frank Taylor of McLeansboro, Ill. stating contact was made September 27, 1948 at 10 am.

What I love about this is all the extras that Jonas added — the picture of the mountain, the hight of Mt. Rainier, and Silver Lake.

Back of 1948 W71G postcard by Jonas Asplund
Back of 1948 W71G postcard by Jonas Asplund

Amateur radio was quite popular in 1948 judging by this 1948 cover of Radio News.

There is quite a history about amateur radio. To read a little, just click HERE. Also to learn more about call signs, check out the Wt71 Group.

Radio News cover 1948
Radio News cover 1948

Images of card courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.

Mount Rainier Trails (early 1900s)

Tourists on the trail in southern end of Olympic National Park
Tourists on the trail in southern end of Olympic National Park

If you wanted to see the Olympic National Park earlier in the 20th century, you may have done it on horseback. This image is of tourists taking in the southern end of the Olympic National Park.

And if you were looking for a guide in the 1940s, you might have had Eatonville’s Jess Dawkins.

Image courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.

Jess Dawkins (1940s)
Jess Dawkins (1940s)

Ohop Bob and Ohop Valley (ca. 1914)

Ohop Bob around 1914 when it was first built
Ohop Bob around 1914 when it was first built

Ohop Bob was built in 1914 by the Tacoma Auto Club. It was operating as a restaurant, serving a wonderful chicken dinner, until the early 1960s.

These two postcards are an early look at the building (in 1922 a second story was added). The first photo shows a brand new building and the spectacular view of Mount Rainier across Ohop Valley.

Ohop Valley and Torger Peterson's home
Ohop Valley and Torger Peterson’s home

The second postcard is a more unique shot. Instead of a shot of Mount Rainier, it shows the view from the restaurant looking down the other direction of the valley. At the far left, Torger Perterson’s house is visible and you can see hay stacked, ready to come in (before the introduction of bailing hay).

Photos courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

A Page From Madora Dawkins’ (1940) Photo Album

Mr. Poppa John (above) and Madora Dawkins (below)
Mr. Poppajohn (above) and Madora Dawkins with friends (below)

This page take straight from Madora Dawkins‘ photo album gives us a glimpse of what it was like in 1940 working up at the Inn at Mount Rainier.

Madora says that Mr. Poppajohn (man dressed in a toga in the top photo) would help kids unwind with employee parties. Many of the kids she said were homesick, this was sometimes their first time away from home.

In the lower photo, Madora is the young woman in the dark blouse talking to her girlfriend.

Photos courtesy of Madora Dawkins.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Ohop Bob 1925 & 2015 (90 years later)

Ohop Bob 1925
Ohop Bob 1925

Ohop Bob was once a wonderful restaurant and place to stay for those heading to or from Mount Rainier. Judging by this postcard, the meals were pretty good. “Aren’t you jealous? (?) Just had a famous southern dinner there on our way home.”

Today, not much remains of the establishment that burned in the 1960s. Here a look at 1925 and today.

Photos courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Ohop Bob 2015 – at a distance

Click on images to enlarge.

Ohop Bob Postcard (1925)
Ohop Bob Postcard (1925)

Ohop Bob 2015 - at a distance

Ohop Bob remains (2015)
Ohop Bob remains (2015)

Paradise Inn and Mount Rainier (ca. 1910)

Mount Rainier and Paradise Inn (ca. 1910)
Mount Rainier and Paradise Inn (ca. 1910)

This spectacular image of Mount Rainier and Paradise Inn was taken around 1910, back when you could take a 12-day cruise from New York to Nova Scotia (including meals) for $60 and “Let Me Call You Sweetheart” was a hit song. It also around then the first self-propelled gas combine harvester was produced by the Holt Co., to replace horse- and tractor-pulled combines.

Things may have changed quite a bit since 1910, but Mount Rainier still remains just a majestic and beautiful, and you can still visit the Paradise Inn.

Image courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

 

 

Staff of Camp In the Clouds (1911)

1911 Staff of Camp in the Clouds
1911 Staff of Camp in the Clouds

In 1911, should be you have the chance to stay at Camp in the Clouds at Mount Rainier, you would have met a number of these folks — the staff mostly from the Ashford area.

“Kate Borden, standing in the middle, is surrounded by family members and neighbors. The camp was open from mid-July to the end of September. This is just one of the several income-generating projects the Borden family undertook each year.” (Mount Rainier National Park.)

Photo courtesy of Laurie Anderson Osborn.

Click on image to enlarge.

Hiking on Paradise Glacier (ca. 1920s)

Paradise Glacier (ca. 1920)
Paradise Glacier (ca. 1920)

People probably started hiking on Mount Rainier the day the found out there was a mountain.

Here’s a postcard  of hikers in the early 1900s on Paradise Glacier (Little Nisqually Glacier). This particular glacier has been receding over the last 100 years. Today it looks quite a bit different from this shot.

Photo courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on image to enlarge.

Nisqually Glacier evolution
Nisqually Glacier evolution

Grouts Travel to Mount Rainier (1919)

Grout Family at Mt. Rainier
Grout Family at Mt. Rainier

Families have enjoyed taking the car up to Mount Rainier since there have been cars. Here are some 1919 shots from the Grout family.

“For many years the Grout family from both sides of the mountain had a family reunion on Mt. Rainer. I think these photos are from 1919 as my father was born in May 1915, and I believe from other photos he is four years old on
these pages.  

My father, Donell Grout, is the little boy by the car, then my grandmother, Arcie Wright Grout [was the principal during the 1921-22 school year at the first Weyerhaeuser school] is standing next to the car by the snow pile. On the other page my grandmother is again seen in the white hat and coat. In the middle photo my grandfather is the man in the overalls and I believe the other man is one of his brothers with his son by the other car. 

In the bottom photo my father is the boy in a hat standing in front with his mother, Arcie, the woman on the left.”

1919 Grouts - Mt. Rainier
1919 Grouts – Mt. Rainier

Gloria Manning