National

Logging in National

Isaacson at National Logging
Isaacson blade used at National for logging

These images come from Sandra Wood, who found them in her father’s things. Since he logged up in National, she assumes they are from that area.

Enjoy!

Photos courtesy of Sandra Wood.

Click on images to enlarge.

Logging in National
Logging in National

 

 

National Mill, ca. 1940s

Panorama of National Mill
Panorama of National Mill

For those of you who find town of National, and the mill that used operate there, fascinating, then you’re in for a treat. This image comes from David Gestrid.  He says, “My dad was  born in National. My grandparents owned a service station there for quite a while.”

Section #1 of National Mill Panorama
Section #1 of National Mill Panorama

He adds that his dad had a hand drawn map of town that he donated to a museum in the area, or something similar. So, if anyone has any information on that, please let me know.

In the meantime, this picture hangs on David’s wall and is a panorama of the mill at National. The other shots are are closer looks are various sections of the photo.

The note at the top is more than a caption. It reads:

This panorama is just the mill yard, it does not include the sawmill building, lath mill, shingle mill, or the huge dry sheds used to store the finished lumber.

National Mill panorama, section #2
National Mill panorama, section #2

After forty years of operating, Mr. Demerest said when the army took his Japanese away who worked there, he would sell the mill for scrap. They came and loaded up my school friends, their parents and we never saw them again, in February 1942. 

This was the Pacific National Lumber Co., seven mile east of Elbe, Washington, all that is left of the mill and town is one house and a little church. The mill was a half mile long and a quarter mile wide, not including the town which was on the sound side of the hi-way, mill in flat south of the town.

National Mill panorama, section #3
National Mill panorama, section #3

It cut 280,000 to 300,000 board feet of lumber and timbers a day. Big timbers were its specialty. In 1943 they cut keels for mine sweeper 128 feet long.” 

Photos courtesy of David Gestrid.

Click on images to enlarge.

National Map (1908)

Map of National
Map of National

This is 1908 plat map of National, filed with Pierce County.

Pat Walgamott says, “An “unofficial” plat of the National townsite;  as far as I know the town never fulfilled its expectations!  This was sent in response to my request for a map of that area.”

Photo courtesy of Pat Walgamott.

Click on image to enlarge.

Eatonville Bank, 1964 . . . Take a Look at those Signs

Eatonville Bank 1964
Eatonville Bank 1964

These shots of the Eatonville Bank are interesting, not just because they were taken in 1964, and things haven’t changed all that much, but because also of the sign out front.

Listed are the following if you continued on Center Street:
19 National
14 Elbe
32 Tacoma
2 Mountain Highway

If you were going to continue on Mashell:
LaGrande
8 Alder
15 Elbe
20 National
22 Ashford
30 Morton
White Pass

Eatonville Bank (2) 1964
Eatonville Bank (2) 1964

29 Rainier National Park, Via Scenic Route
5 Clay City
10 Kapowsin
25 Puyallup
52 Seattle
17 Yelm
30 Tacoma

Gary Hendrickson said he used to live in the arpartment over the bank, and it looks from this shot that there was still an apartment.

If you want to read more about the bank—and the robberies—click HERE.

Photos courtesy of the Baublits family, taken by Joe Larin.

Click on images to enlarge.

A Drive Down an early Canyon Road

1909 Drive Down Canyon Road
1909 Drive Down Canyon Road

Pat Walgamott says, “I found this picture of the road along the Nisqually River about 1909….at least what can be seen of it. This is my grandfather driving, Smith H. Miller, from National driving three ladies (probably,  Mrs. John Dobson Scollard, my grandmother Maude Looney Miller, and Cora Looney) down from Pacific National Mill back to Chehalis or Tacoma.”

Pat wasn’t sure exactly where the photo was taken, but it turned out we could place the car on Canyon Road. They were driving past the construction camp that didn’t come down until the 1950s.
Photo courtesy of Pat Walgamott.
Click on images to enlarge.
Canyon Road Camp (ca. 1920s)
Canyon Road Camp (ca. 1920s)

Tokens from National (late 1800s and early 1900s)

C.C. Ketchum Token from National
C.C. Ketchum Token from National

The old-timers might remember the town of National, a logging town up the line. There isn’t much left not except for some photos.

Randy Stewart also came across some tokens from the town. Both are from C.C. Ketchum tokens.

Token with the hole in the center was popular in the late 1800s.

Now I’m not sure (I’m taking this off the internet on a forum about tokens) but the token with the hole in it was possibly used for gambling.

“I have read posts [*] that also say they were used in slot or game of chance machines. You would put in a U.S. nickel and the machine would pay out in trade tokens to get around the gambling laws. The numbers are supposed to have linked the tokens to a certain machine.”

National Loggers - photo from UofW Library
National Loggers – photo from UofW Library

Another man said, “I’ve heard that those were used in slot machines in bars. To get around the gambling prohibition, the machine would pay out in those tokens, which were supposedly redeemable only for merchandise. Unofficially, the bartender would give cash for them if he knew you well enough.”

All I know is that these coins were used at National, probably by a bunch of loggers like these.

Thank you Randy for sharing.

Images Courtesy of Randy Stewart.

Click on images to enlarge. 

C.C. Ketchum Token from National (back)
C.C. Ketchum Token from National (back)
C.C. Ketchum Token from National #2
C.C. Ketchum Token from National #2

 

 

 

 

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Old Trestle Near National (ca. 1987)

Old trestle near National
Old trestle near National

“Taken about 28 years ago, this is a old trestle near National on the south side of the Nisqually River, about a half mile from the National mill pond. A beaver dam on Lake Creek provided a great fishing spot for a couple years. The rail went to the Little Incline, a good story for later. I’m pretty sure there are pictures of the incline somewhere. Joe Rotter is in the bottom, left center, ” Carl Rotter.

He adds, “There were two inclines. This trestle may have served both. If you are familiar with the road behind National that went past the mill pond and across the Nisqually (bridge now washed out) and continues across a flat and then comes to a “t”, the Big Incline was to the right and the Little Incline to the left. To get to this trestle, you would turn left at the “t” and go until the road turns right to Bear Basin and Anderson Lake (no longer driveable). Park at were the road turns and walk the other way (North-ish?). These directions are not to direct you to the spot but rather to give you an idea of where it is located. And as with any history, I may not have it all quite right.”

Photo courtesy of Carl Rotter.

Click on image to enlarge.

Logging in National (ca. 1920)

High Lead
High Lead

National, Wash. was an active logging area for years. A widely known photographer, Clark Kinsey, who documented the Northwest logging industry took some amazing pictures of the logging sites.

Here is a Kinsey shot taken around 1920. You have to look closely to see the logger. He probably wouldn’t get high marks from OSHA today, but it definitely looks exciting.

The photo is entitled High Lead. High lead logging, a method of cable logging, was pretty common during that time. In fact, you can see the cables strung to the top of the tree. If you’d like to read more about high lead logging, just click here. 

Photos are courtesy of Laurie Anderson Osborn. 

Click on images to enlarge.