Taking the Train in 1912

I’ve always loved postcards, especially those that have have a message and were sent off.

I love that you get to see what the person had to say back then. What note or message they wanted to jot down and send off to a friend. Like listening to the echo of a long ago conversation.

Train

Also, the card (in this case over 100 years old) was important enough or that person was dear enough that the recipient kept it around.

This card was mailed in Eatonville, February 12, 1912 (a month before the Titanic went down). There was a train running through the town and as we read — the grass is green, it’s warm and rainy, and Oscar and Margaret are at the train.

Arnie Haynes’ Boy Scout First Aid Kit

Boy scout motto is “be prepared” and that obviously included Boy Scout Arndon (Arnie) Haynes of Troop #63.

This was Arnie’s first aid kit that included gauze bandages, mercurochrome swabs and iodine.

If you aren’t familiar with mercurochrome (merbromin) swabs, as it’s name suggests it contained a bit of mercury. You would dab a little and it acted like an antibacterial antiseptic and left at yellow-green sheen. In 1978 the FDA started reviewing products containing mercury. Although there seems to be no ill-effects from the product, it appears no one wanted to go to the extensive effort to do all the studies to prove it, and it left the shelves.

I see there are few things missing in the pack, including the Vivo swabs, which say they are used for “shock or fainting.” Which makes me wonder, did Arnie have to use them?

Arnie Haynes

Thank you Roni Johnson (his daughter) for sharing these great images.

Leo Pechhia 1961

Leo Pechhia, Sept. 1961

If you have watched a movie at the Eatonville Roxy theater, you have Leo (Angelo) Pechhia to thank. He and his wife built the theater in the 1940s.

Here we see Leo standing in front of the theater in September 1961. (This was a big year for movies — West Side Story, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, 101 Dalmatians and The Parent Trap.)

To read about the whole history of the Eatonville theater, just click HERE.

In short, Leo built a number of theaters in the area. “By the 40s Leo was also operating additional theaters in Randle, Mineral, Morton, Steilacoom, Old Town and Salkum, as well as the Narrows Theater in Tacoma, which he built in 1949.”

Leo and his Regina were originally from Italy and built their home in Eatonville. It’s the brick house still standing on Carter with figs growing beside the garage — fig trees that Regina brought from Italy.

Leo and his wife sold the Eatonville theater in the late 1970s.

Photo courtesy of the Baublits family and late photographer Joe Larin.

Click on image to enlarge.

Welcome to Eatonville Sign

Welcome to Eatonville, 1955 and Today

Back in 1955, long before it was Nevitt Park, there was just a simple sign that welcomed people to Eatonville and a street sign that directed people to the city center and to Mt. Rainier via Scenic Route 29.

I personally love this street sign because “29” was obviously hand painted in as an afterthought.

Welcome sign in Eatonville

Today the park, which was named after the town’s Dr. Nevitt, may be a little showier, but the town is still just as simple and sweet.

Photo courtesy of the Baublits family and late photographer Joe Larin.

Click on image to enlarge.






Eatonville Hotel – 1963

If you were walking down Mashell Ave., past Key Bank, toward the Roxy, on the right you would see the Eatonville Hotel. It was part of the Eatonville landscape for many decades.

It was built in 1912 and was known as the Snow Hotel. In 1913, the rates were $2.00 a night, which would have been around $46.00 today. Not a bad deal.

To learn more, just search Eatonville Hotel. There are more postings on this site.

Photo courtesy of the Baublits family and late photographer Joe Larin.

Click on image to enlarge.

Logging camp

Logging Camp, ca. 1940s

I’m not sure exactly where this logging camp was located, or what logging company it belonged to, except that is was at the base of Mt. Rainier. What I think is amazing about this shot though is the scope of the logging.

Take a look at that logging camp in the center of it all, the railroad that took the logs out and the trestle. Just zoom in and take a look.

Photos courtesy of Sandra Woods.

Click on image to enlarge.

Kneip’s Trucking Service (cir. 1956)

These photos taken of Kneip’s Trucking don’t show Eatonville at its best, but you do get a glimpse of 1956 Mashell Ave. If you would like a little background on the business, just click HERE.

Notice to the right of the first shot is Babe’s Cafe where you can get some Pepsi and home made pie.

The next show is a full of view. You may recognize the building now. It’s the Postnet building.

The last photo is nice because you can see down Mashell, with the high school in the background. The F.O.E. (Fraternal Order of Eagles) and the Shell station are easy to spot too.

mber 3
Kneip Building looking toward the high school.

Photos courtesy of the Baublits family and late photographer Joe Larin.

Click on images to enlarge.

Alder Dam

Alder Dam Under Construction (Aug. 23, 1943)

The Alder Dam (aka La Grande Dam) was built in the 40s, replacing an earlier version. This show reads: Aug. 23, 1943, La Grande Dam, View Downstream Toward East Abutment.

This building of the dam and the creation of the reservoir had a big impact, requiring buildings to be moved, as well as the railroad track.

The building of the first dam in 1912 created the first all-electric city in La Grande, Washington.

Click on image to enlarge.

Barneey’s Motel (the 60s)

Barneey’s has recently exchanged hands again. Thought it might be a good time to post a shot of the early days — probably the early 60s based on the cars.

Matchbook cover from Barneey’s Motel and Restaurant.

Back then is was a motel and restaurant for those coming through. This old matchbook cover looks like it evolved from motel to permanent guests as well.

You can look around on this site and see how Barneey’s evolved over the years. Good luck to the new owners.

Click on images to enlarge.

Pacific National Lumber Co.

This wonderful shot of a crew at the Pacific National Lumber Co. was taken by Kinsey in the early 1900s. A few things to note:

  1. Not much safety equipment back then. No hard hats to be seen.
  2. Wonder example of an operation on a sled or skid. Look at the size of the timber.
  3. This is, I think, a steam donkey on skids, although I don’t see a stack. A steam donkey would pull the log toward it through the woods. The steam donkey would also move itself around the woods by tying off to a tree and pulling itself to forward.

It was hard work and these men put on long hours.

Click on image to enlarge.