1910

Ashford Postcard, December 25, 1910

Ashford Postcard Dec. 25, 1910
Ashford Postcard Dec. 25, 1910

One hundred and six years ago, December 25, 1910, this postcard was mailed off from Ashford, Washington, to a friend in Orting.

What struck me was that there was someone at the Ashford postoffice on Christmas day. I did a little research and I believe that person was Mrs. Cora J. Ashford (Mrs. Walter A. Ashford).

The Ashford post office was established November 16, 1894, and Cora ran it for almost 40 years, until Louis Von Salzen took over December 13, 1933.

Here is what Guy Ramsey writes about the post office in Postmarked Washington: Pierce County.

“A combination store-hotel was built on the north side of State Highway 5, which passes through the village, and the post office was located there until transferred to Louis Von Salzen’s store on the opposite (southwest) corner of the intersecting street.

The first mail to Ashford’s place came over a trail through the forest by horseback from Meta. After the Elbe post office was opened, June 4, 1892, it was brought from that point either by horseback or stage.

The Tacoma and Eastern Railroad finished its line to Ashford in 1904 and thereafter Ashford’s mail was supplied by trains. Mr. Ashford would go to the depot with the pushcart to obtain it.”

Ashford Postcard Dec. 25, 1910 (back)
Ashford Postcard Dec. 25, 1910 (back)

Image courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.

Walter Ashford and Family
Walter Ashford and Family (Cora on the far left)

 

Clara (Fiander) Jensen and John Jensen Out Hunting (ca. 1910)

Clara (Fiander) Jensen and John Jensen out hunting
Clara (Fiander) Jensen and John Jensen out hunting

Clara (Fiander) Jensen was known for her hunting skills. In fact, her hunting prowess was covered by Sunset Magazine in 1923. Although folks who read the article may know her for tracking cats, she was a big part of the community for her entire life.

She’s pictured here with her husband John Jensen. They were married in 1902.

Click on image to enlarge.

Photo courtesy of Kathi Henderson, Clara’s granddaughter.

Picture of Clara Jensen that appeared in Sunset Magazine. Pelt is of the 45-pound wildcat she took down.
Picture of Clara Jensen that appeared in Sunset Magazine. Pelt is of the 45-pound wildcat she took down.

 

Marie Lutkens Postcard (1910)

Marie Lutkens Postcard 1910
Marie Lutkens Postcard 1910

Today we text. Yesterday we sent postcards. This particular postcard was sent from Chehalis, Wash., in 1910 to Marie Lutkins (Lutkens) in Elbe. Her dad had built the Lutkens Hotel in 1894. He was quite the fisherman and kept the hotel stocked with all the trout it needed.

I found a reference that board at the hotel was $10 to $12 per month for teachers. (History of Tacoma Eastern Area)

She was a hiker. There is a shot of Marie climbing Mt. Rainier glaciers with her friends.

Marie Lutkens Postcard 1910 (back)
Marie Lutkens Postcard 1910 (back)
Lutkens Hotel, built in 1894
Lutkens Hotel, built in 1894

 

 

Paradise Inn and Mount Rainier (ca. 1910)

Mount Rainier and Paradise Inn (ca. 1910)
Mount Rainier and Paradise Inn (ca. 1910)

This spectacular image of Mount Rainier and Paradise Inn was taken around 1910, back when you could take a 12-day cruise from New York to Nova Scotia (including meals) for $60 and “Let Me Call You Sweetheart” was a hit song. It also around then the first self-propelled gas combine harvester was produced by the Holt Co., to replace horse- and tractor-pulled combines.

Things may have changed quite a bit since 1910, but Mount Rainier still remains just a majestic and beautiful, and you can still visit the Paradise Inn.

Image courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on image to enlarge.

 

 

 

Camp of the Clouds (ca. 1910)

Camp in the Clouds
Camp in the Clouds

If you were looking for “glamping” at Mount Rainier back in the late 1800s or early 1900s, Camp of the Clouds was the way to go.

“Camp of the Clouds was first established in 1886 at the 5,900-foot level on the east end of Alta Vista Ridge. The tent hotel was set up and removed each year. It offered a spectacular view of both the mountain and the Tatoosh Ridge.” (Mount Rainier National Park, by Donald Johnstone.)

Photo courtesy of Laurie Anderson Osborn.

Click on image to enlarge.

Tatoosh Ridge
Tatoosh Ridge

Valley Fair — Eatonville Band and Its Bull (ca. 1910)

Eatonville Band at Valley Fair
Eatonville Band at Valley Fair

The Eatonville School Band played at the early Western Washington Fair in 1910, then called the Valley Fair. This year, the band had a special attraction, a bull. I’ll have to find out the name of the bull, as it’s still remembered as an incredibly friendly bull. As you can see, the smaller members of the band even got to ride him.

I guess it beats marching.

Photos courtesy of Pat Van Eaton.

Click on images to enlarge.

Eatonville School band at valley fair
Eatonville School band at Valley Fair ca. 1910 – photo courtesy of Pat Van Eaton

Eatonville Band at the Washington State Fair 1910

Kjelstad/Burwash Barn Then and Now (104 years later)

Burwash barn (originally built in 1910 by the Kjelstads)
Burwash barn (originally built in 1910 by the Kjelstads)

The Kjelstad barn in Ohop Valley was built in 1910. Today it is part of the Nisqually Land Trust and looks just as grand as the day it was built. I hope they keep it intact for the community to enjoy.

Images courtesy of the Burwash family and Diane Mettler.

Kjelstad barn - early 1900s
Kjelstad barn – early 1900s

Click on images to enlarge.

New Eatonville Hospital (ca. 1909)

First Eatonville Hospital (ca. 1909)
First Eatonville Hospital (ca. 1909)

Eatonville’s first hospital and staff.  In fact, if you look off to the right you can see a carpenter still working on it.

“The first doctor, D. A. Martiny, came in 1904. Before 1910 he built The Lumbermen’s Hospital, the first hospital, at the corner of Mashell Ave. N. and Lynch Street across form where the high school stands.” (Timber Town and Later, by Edith Erickson)

The building still stands today.

If anyone has information on the nursing staff back then, I’d love to give the ladies some credit.

Photo courtesy of the South Pierce County Historical Society.

Click on image to enlarge.

They made Eatonville their home

Young Eatonville (ca. 1910)
Young Eatonville (ca. 1910)

I like this picture because you could just Photoshop different clothes on them, and wouldn’t be able to tell then from Eatonville residents today or yesterday.

This is definitely yesterday though. Pictured are . . .
Back row, left to right:  Ethel (Kipper) Martin, Carrie (Kipper) Martin, Milton Smith and Hessie Smith.
Front row, left to right: Walter Guske, Rock King, Leslie Kipper

Red Men & Pocahontas
Carrie Kipper Martin was a a charter member of one of the oldest fraternal organization in Eatonville — the Topeka Council, Degree of Pocahontas. It held it’s first meeting in Red Men’s Hall August 16, 1910.

Carrie writes about the Pocahontas . . . “The history of the Degree of Pocahontas is so closely interwoven with the history of the Improved Order of the Red Men and the history of the Unites States of America, that one is not complete without the others. They are the oldest fraternal orders of purely American origin in the Unites States. The spirit of patriotism and liberty is the hearts of our great Revolutionary heroes in 1765 inspired them to conceal their identity and keep their places and meetings secret.

Back side of Image
Back side of Image

They disguised themselves as Red Men (Indians) of the Great Confederation of the Iroquois. It was from this source that the two orders have derived their costumes, ritual ceremonies, and mannerisms of tribal and council government. It was one of these groups that disguised as Red Men, dumped the King’s tea in Boston Harbor.” (History of Southeastern Pierce County).

Photo courtesy of the D. Smith and family.

Click on image to enlarge.