1940s

National Mill, ca. 1940s

Panorama of National Mill
Panorama of National Mill

For those of you who find town of National, and the mill that used operate there, fascinating, then you’re in for a treat. This image comes from David Gestrid.  He says, “My dad was  born in National. My grandparents owned a service station there for quite a while.”

Section #1 of National Mill Panorama
Section #1 of National Mill Panorama

He adds that his dad had a hand drawn map of town that he donated to a museum in the area, or something similar. So, if anyone has any information on that, please let me know.

In the meantime, this picture hangs on David’s wall and is a panorama of the mill at National. The other shots are are closer looks are various sections of the photo.

The note at the top is more than a caption. It reads:

This panorama is just the mill yard, it does not include the sawmill building, lath mill, shingle mill, or the huge dry sheds used to store the finished lumber.

National Mill panorama, section #2
National Mill panorama, section #2

After forty years of operating, Mr. Demerest said when the army took his Japanese away who worked there, he would sell the mill for scrap. They came and loaded up my school friends, their parents and we never saw them again, in February 1942. 

This was the Pacific National Lumber Co., seven mile east of Elbe, Washington, all that is left of the mill and town is one house and a little church. The mill was a half mile long and a quarter mile wide, not including the town which was on the sound side of the hi-way, mill in flat south of the town.

National Mill panorama, section #3
National Mill panorama, section #3

It cut 280,000 to 300,000 board feet of lumber and timbers a day. Big timbers were its specialty. In 1943 they cut keels for mine sweeper 128 feet long.” 

Photos courtesy of David Gestrid.

Click on images to enlarge.

King’s Place Ad

King's Place Matchbook 1
King’s Place Matchbook 1

These matchbook covers for King’s Place are probably from the 1940s or early 1950s. My understanding is that three-digit phone numbers were only used prior to 1958. But I’m hardly an expert on the topic. Feel free to correct me.

King's Place Matchbook 2
King’s Place Matchbook 2

King’s Place was located near the Ohop Grange, and was a popular place to eat for decades.

If you want to read more on the history of the popular roadside diner, just click HERE.

Images courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.

King's Place (ca. late 50s)
King’s Place (ca. late 50s)

 

LaGrande Gas Pump (1940s)

Gas pump in LaGrande, 1940s
Gas pump in LaGrande, 1940s

This wonderful image is provided courtesy of Jeannie Woehl and Tacoma Power. It looks like a single gas pump in LaGrande, Washington, probably from the 1940s while they were working on the dam. And, of course, based on the cars we can see.

If anyone has more light to shed on this image, please add a comment or two.

Click on image to enlarge.

Eatonville in the 30s or 40s

View of Eatonville in the 40s
View of Eatonville in the 30s or 40s

Saundra Hill posted this shot of the town on the Eatonville History Facebook page.

She says, “Aerial view of Eatonville 1930’s or 1940’s. I found this in my grandma’s photos, Lila Puariea, who moved to Eatonville in 1935 on Scott Turner Road with husband Mose and children Elizabeth “Dode” Puariea Hill, Eugene “Bud” Puariea and Donna Puariea Deck.”

I like that you can see the steam coming from the burner at the Eatonville Lumber Company.

Click on image to enlarge.

Barney’s Matchbook Cover

Matchbook Barney's (ca. 1950s)
Matchbook Barney’s (ca. 1950s)

Locals know Barney’s Corner as a gas station, but early on it was much, much more.

Matchbook Barney's reverse (ca. 1950s)
Matchbook Barney’s reverse (ca. 1950s)

I believe this matchbook cover comes from around the 1940s. Back then there was food and dance.

Barney was Keith Malcom’s brother and he opened the establishment when he got back from WWII — a survivor of Pearl Harbor.

Images courtesy of Diane Mettler.

Click on images to enlarge.

Eatonville Lumber Company Piping Plan (1940s)

Layout of the Eatonville Lumber Mill
Layout of the Eatonville Lumber Mill

Dan Hamilton shares this incredible find.

“It’s a water piping plan [for the Eatonville Lumber Co.] from the 1940’s. It is the most accurate and complete layout of the mill site I have ever seen. The original is 36″ x 52″, scan is a bit poor, but zoom in and considering it’s age, pretty neat,” he says.

Image courtesy of Dan Hamilton.
Click on image to enlarge.

Logging Accident in Eatonville (ca. 1940s)

Logging truck accident - 1940s
Logging truck accident – 1940s

These pictures come straight from the Eatonville History Facebook group. This accident took place at the intersection of Washington Ave. and Center St., in the 1940s. Hope no one was in the vehicle.

Even though logging is safer than it was in the past, Forbes reported in 2013 that it was still first on American’s 10 Deadliest Jobs list.

Click on images to enlarge.

Logging truck accident, Center St. & Washington (ca. 1940s)
Logging truck accident, Center St. & Washington (ca. 1940s)

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The Second Canyada Lodge, 1940s

Canyada Lodge #2, 1940s
Canyada Lodge #2, 1940s

The second Canyada Lodge didn’t look quite as grand, but it was still a great stop for tourists in the 1940s.

Back of the postcard reads: And ideal place to spend the week ends or stop over night to and from America’s most beautiful Mountain. Our rooms are comfortable and modern in every respect. Table service family style. Mrs. Lenk’s Fried Chicken Dinner with hot biscuits and country gravy will surely please you. Our breakfasts and luncheons are unexcelled.

Click on image to enlarge.

Postcard, backside, Canyada Lodge 1940s
Postcard, backside, Canyada Lodge 1940s